Year: 2012

Videos

Product Owner from Good to Great

A good product owner is probably the most important role in any Scrum project but for some reason they are exceedingly rare. Without one the development team is without direction and lost in a vast ocean of possibilities. Why is it that being a good product owner is difficult? What is expected and how do […]

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Requirements Management Blogs
Blogs Knowledge

User Stories That Are Too Big

In this blog post, Jeffrey Davidson discusses the fact that a common issue for Scrum teams is that their user stories are too big. He explains that many teams ask for larger stories because they don’t know how to slice the work into smaller pieces. Writing smaller user stories will make your team happier and […]

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Requirements Management Blogs
Blogs Knowledge

Minimal Viable Products

In this blog post, Cory Foy discusses how to apply the Pareto law, the famous 80/20 rule, to the concept of minimal viable product. He defines two starting positions: you have to sell a solution for a problem or there is an actual need in a market. A Standish research shows that 45% of the […]

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Videos

Can Requirements and Agile Work Together

This software testing podcast discusses why requirements are still needed in many projects, and how to work with both requirements and user stories to deliver on the promise of Agile.

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Requirements Management Resources
Resources

International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA)

The International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) is an independent non-profit professional association for business analyst. IIBA was established in 2003 as a Canadian Corporation. Its mission is to develop and maintain standards for the practice of business analysis and for the certification of its practitioners. IIBA local chapters exist in many cities in Canada, […]

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Requirements Management Blogs
Blogs Knowledge

Do Not Design for Users

In this blog post, Mike Long discusses the current trend to design applications for specific users or “personas”. His point is that “focusing on individuals might improve things for one person at the cost of others.” He prefers instead Activity-Centered Design (ACD) that focuses on the activity context in which individuals interact with the product.

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